FAIRY TALES OF SLAV PEASANTS AND HERDSMEN
ebook

FAIRY TALES OF SLAV PEASANTS AND HERDSMEN (ebook)

Editorial:
MIDWEST JOURNAL PRESS
ISBN:
9781387092888
Formato:
Epublication content package
DRM
Si

Fairy Tales of the Slav Peasants and Herdsmen was written in the year 1896 by Aleksander Chodzko. This book is one of his most popular novels, and has been translated into several other languages around the world. THE ABODE OF THE GODS (excerpt) Once upon a time there were two brothers whose father had left them but a small fortune. The eldest grew very rich, but at the same time cruel and wicked, whereas there was nowhere a more honest or kinder man than the younger. But he remained poor, and had many children, so that at times they could scarcely get bread to eat. At last, one day there was not even this in the house, so he went to his rich brother and asked him for a loaf of bread. Waste of time! His rich brother only called him beggar and vagabond, and slammed the door in his face. The poor fellow, after this brutal reception, did not know which way to turn. Hungry, scantily clad, shivering with cold, his legs could scarcely carry him along. He had not the heart to go home, with nothing for the children, so he went towards the mountain forest. But all he found there were some wild pears that had fallen to the ground. He had to content himself with eating these, though they set his teeth on edge. But what was he to do to warm himself, for the east wind with its chill blast pierced him through and through. "Where shall I go?" he said; "what will become of us in the cottage? There is neither food nor fire, and my brother has driven me from his door." It was just then he remembered having heard that the top of the mountain in front of him was made of crystal, and had a fire for ever burning upon it. "I will try and find it," he said, "and then I may be able to warm myself a little." So he went on climbing higher and higher till he reached the top, when he was startled to see twelve strange beings sitting round a huge fire. He stopped for a moment, but then said to himself, "What have I to lose? Why should I fear? God is with me. Courage!" So he advanced towards the fire, and bowing respectfully, said: "Good people, take pity on my distress. I am very poor, no one cares for me, I have not even a fire in my cottage; will you let me warm myself at yours?" They all looked kindly at him, and one of them said: "My son, come sit down with us and warm yourself." So he sat down, and felt warm directly he was near them. But he dared not speak while they were silent. What astonished him most was that they changed seats one after another, and in such a way that each one passed round the fire and came back to his own place. When he drew near the fire an old man with long white beard and bald head arose from the flames and spoke to him thus:... Aleksander Borejko Chod?ko (30 August 1804 ? 27 December 1891) was a Polish poet, Slavist, and Iranologist. He was born in Krzywicze in Russia (today's Kryvi?y, Belarus), and attended the University of Vilnius. He was a member of the Filaret Association and the Institute of Oriental Studies that was attached to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Empire in Saint Petersburg. From 1830 until 1844 he worked as a Russian diplomat in Iran. From 1852 until 1855 he worked for the French Foreign Ministry in Paris. He succeeded Adam Mickiewicz in the chair of Slavic languages and literatures in the Collège de France, holding the post from 1857 until 1883. He was a member of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland and the Société de Linguistique de Paris.

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